The Children of Immigrants
Longitudinal Study in Norway
(CILS-NOR)

The Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study in Norway is a long term research program designed to study social mobility and cultural adaptation among children of immigrants and their majority peers in the capital region of Norway.

A baseline study among 16 year olds was conducted in 2016. Using updated register data and follow-up surveys, we will follow this cohort of adolescents through the educational system and into adulthood.

The CILS-design is a comprehensive, standardized method for studying intergenerational integration of children of immigrants, and has been implemented in the US, the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Sweden and Spain.

The first module of the CILS-NOR project was established in 2015 and concluded in 2020. The second module of the project will run from 2021 until 2025.

The project

  • Immigrants in Norway come from all over the world and from all walks of life. Many, however, find themselves in the lower parts of the Norwegian socio-economic hierarchy, and many remain distinct from the majority population in terms of religion, cultural orientations and ethnic identities. The long term consequences of immigration will therefore to a large extent be shaped by how their children adapt and become part of the socio-economic structure as well as the social and cultural fabric of society.

    • Will they experience upward social mobility through education and work, or will they stagnate in the often marginalized positions of their parents?
    • Will they maintain the cultural orientations of their parents’ countries of birth or will they gradually adapt their beliefs and orientations to the surrounding society?
    • Will they be accepted as equals by the majority or will they remain excluded from mainstream society?
    • And how will the Norwegian society be transformed, as immigrants and their descendants are incorporated into it?

    As new generations of ethnically diverse adolescents move into adulthood, investigating the forces that shape their opportunities and adaptations not just in in education, employment, but also in the social and cultural life of Norwegian society is crucial for understanding the challenges of the future, in terms of social cohesion, inequality and sustainability.

  • In 2016, a baseline survey of adolescents enrolled in their first year of secondary schooling (VG1) was conducted, when most were 16–17 years old. Students in Oslo and Akershus counties, plus selected schools in the nearby city of Drammen was targeted, and the data covers the capital city as well as major adjacent areas and communities. In total, 7627 students filled out the questionnaire. Through personal ID-numbers obtained from school authorities, the survey data was linked with administrative registry data, providing reliable information on demographic, household and economic background variables.

    In 2021 and 2022, we will collect information about these same youth, using updated register data and a follow-up survey. While the data from the first module provided comprehensive information about their social situation in adolescence, the second module will focus on the crucial transition into early adulthood, in terms of education, employment and family life.

  • The CILS-NOR study has been funded by the Norwegian Research Council through two separate projects:

    • 2015–2020: CILS-NOR: The Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study in Norway (Module I)
    • 2021–2025: Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study in Norway Modul 2: Explaining socioeconomic outcomes and cultural adaptations in early adulthood
  • The CILS-NOR project is part of a collaborative network to promote comparative research on adaptation and social mobility among children of immigrants, including:

    Affiliated projects:

    • IntegrateYouth
    • CILS4EU (Children of immigrants longitudinal survey in four European countries)
    • ILSEG (The Longitudinal Study of the Second Generation)
    • CILS (The Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study)

Publications

Who wants to be Norwegian – who gets to be Norwegian?

2021

Jon Horgen Friberg (2021) Who wants to be Norwegian – who gets to be Norwegian? Identificational assimilation and non-recognition among immigrant origin youth in Norway, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 44:16, 21-43, DOI: 10.1080/01419870.2020.1857813

Decline, revival, change? Religious adaptations among Muslim and non-Muslim immigrant origin youth in Norway

2021
Friberg, J. H., & Sterri, E. B. (2021). Decline, Revival, Change? Religious Adaptations among Muslim and Non-Muslim Immigrant Origin Youth in Norway. International Migration Review. DOI: 10.1177/0197918320986767

Does selective acculturation work?

2019

Friberg, J. H. (2019). Does selective acculturation work? Cultural orientations, educational aspirations and school effort among children of immigrants in Norway. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. DOI: 10.1080/1369183X.2019.1602471

Konflikt, fellesskap og forandring

2019

Friberg, J. H. (2019). Konflikt, fellesskap og forandring. Foreldreskap og sosial kontroll i innvandrede familier fra Pakistan, Somalia og Sri Lanka. Oslo: Cappelen Damm Akademisk. DOI: 10.23865/noasp.75

Innvandrernes etterkommere: Teoretiske og komparative perspektiver

2017

Friberg, J. H. & Midtbøen, A. H. (2017). Innvandrernes etterkommere: Teoretiske og komparative perspektiver. Norsk sosiologisk tidsskrift 01 / 2017 (Volum 1). DOI: 10.18261/issn.2535-2512-2017-01-01

Assimilering på norsk

2016
Fafo-rapport 2016:43